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About the conference

This meeting marks the public release of the entire 3D-HST dataset. We will discuss the state of the field: now that we have all of this great data, from 3D-HST and from other surveys, along with ever more realistic simulations, do we actually begin to understand how galaxies evolve? The meeting will be held in New Haven, CT at Yale University's Maurice R. Greenberg Conference Center. The main program is 3 days, Monday November 16 - Wednesday November 18, with an extra morning (Thursday the 19th) for people who would like more information on the 3D-HST dataset. Each day has a theme:

Nov 16: Census

The inventory of the Universe as a function of cosmic time.

Nov 17: Evolution

How individual galaxies move through time.

Nov 18: Physics

What processes drive this evolution?

Nov 19: Hack Day

An extra day to work on projects and dive into the 3D-HST dataset.

confirmed participants


  • Hakim Atek

    Yale

  • Guillermo Barro

    UCO/Lick

  • Sirio Belli

    Caltech

  • Rachel Bezanson

    University of Arizona

  • Jeremy Bradford

    Yale

  • Gabriel Brammer

    STScI

  • Alyson Brooks

    Rutgers

  • Mila Chadayammuri

    Yale

  • Alison Coil

    UCSD

  • Charlie Conroy

    Harvard

  • Shany Danieli

    Yale

  • Claire Dickey

    Yale

  • Louise Edwards

    Yale

  • Natascha Foerster-Schreiber

    MPE MPG

  • John Forbes

    UCSC

  • Marijn Franx

    Leiden University

  • Marla Geha

    Yale

  • Shy Genel

    Columbia

  • Norman Grogin

    STScI

  • Alaina Henry

    NASA/GSFC

  • Tucker Jones

    UCSB

  • Dusan Keres

    UCSD

  • Anton Koekemoer

    STScI

  • Ivo Labbe

    Leiden University

  • Johannes Ulf Lange

    Yale

  • Joel Leja

    Yale

  • Jennifer Lotz

    STScI

  • Britt Lundgren

    AAAS Fellow

  • Sangeeta Malhotra

    ASU

  • Danilo Marchesini

    Tufts

  • Michael Maseda

    MPIA

  • J. Trevor Mendel

    MPE MPG

  • Allison Merritt

    Yale

  • Adrian Meyers

    Yale

  • Ivelina Momcheva

    Yale

  • Mireia Montes Quiles

    Yale

  • Lamiya Mowla

    Yale

  • Adam Muzzin

    Cambridge

  • Priya Natarajan

    Yale

  • Erica Nelson

    Yale

  • Andrew Newman

    Carnegie

  • Pascal Oesch

    Yale

  • Camilla Pacifici

    STScI

  • Nor Pirzkal

    STScI

  • Marc Rafelski

    NASA

  • Naveen Reddy

    " UC Riverside"

  • Gregory Rudnick

    University of Kansas

  • M. Claudia Scarlata

    University of Minnesota

  • Kasper Schmidt

    UCSB

  • Brian Siana

    UCR

  • Rosalind Skelton

    SAAO

  • David Sobral

    Leiden University

  • Rachel Somerville

    Rutgers

  • Allison Strom

    Caltech

  • Paul Torrey

    MIT Kavli Institute

  • Grant Tremblay

    Yale

  • Freeke van de Voort

    Berkeley

  • Frank van den Bosch

    Yale

  • Arjen van der Wel

    MPIA

  • Pieter van Dokkum

    Yale

  • Kim-Vy Tran

    TAMU

  • David Wake

    UCL

  • Ben Weiner

    Arizona

  • Sarah Wellons

    Harvard

  • Katherine Whitaker

    UMASS Amherst

  • Emily Wisnioski

    MPE

  • Eva Wuyts

    MPE

  • Stijn Wuyts

    University of Bath

PROGRAM

If you would like to join remotely, we have set up a WebEx conference which will be open throughout the day. Click HERE to join the conference call (meeting number: 642 095 424, meeting password: cep2015_newhaven).
We have turned off the volume, please contact the speaker via e-mail with fillow up questions.

Coffee and pastries will be provided at the Greenberg Center.


20 min

Lobby

Anton Koekemoer

The CANDELS survey: overview and science results

The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), a 902-orbit HST multi-cycle treasury program with ACS and WFC3, is designed to document the evolution of galaxies and black holes from z ~8 to ~1.5, as well as enabling the discovery of Type Ia supernovae at z > 1.5 for cosmology studies. The survey covers a total of ~800 square arcminutes located across 5 well-studied fields (GOODS-N+S, COSMOS, EGS and UDS), and consists of both wide and deep regions, achieving 5-sigma depths in H of ~27 and ~28 (AB) respectively, while also providing panchromatic imaging from ~0.4 to ~1.6 microns. This talk will review the survey observations and data products, along with current science results including high-z galaxies and star-formation histories ('cosmic dawn'), morphological results on mergers, AGN and massive galaxies ('cosmic noon'), results from supernova rates at high redshift, and prospects for future work as well as synergies with other programs.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Norman Grogin

Hunting Distant Low-Luminosity AGN via CANDELS Variability

The CANDELS combination of sensitivity, high resolution, and time spacing is well-suited to detect optical and near-infrared variability, extending the census of fainter AGN among many thousands of moderate- to high-redshift galaxies (H<25; I<26). I present preliminary results of a galactic nuclei variability search in the CANDELS/Wide fields, with rest-frame time-scales of weeks to years. I present the redshift distribution of the variables, and compare with the known AGN candidates in the fields from deep Spitzer and Chandra imaging.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Jennifer Lotz

Beyond Bulges and Disks: Tracking the Metamorphosis of Galaxies at z<2.5

A galaxy's assembly history is encoded in its stellar mass, star-formation history, kinematics, and morphology. The structures of galaxies provide direct insight into their most recent assembly events, as well as longer timescale secular processes that drive star-formation and quenching. Thanks to SDSS and HST, we now have a broad-brush picture of how galaxy structures evolve over the past 10 billion years. Yet the processes for bulge formation, star-formation quenching, and early-type galaxy assembly remain unclear. Coarse bulge/disk/irregular structural classifications fail to capture the complex processes responsible for the morphological transformation of galaxies. I will present new quantitative non-parametric methods for measuring structure and classifying galaxy morphology, which make minimal assumptions about the intrinsic shapes and statistical distributions of galaxies. We track the observed 0.5 < z < 2.5 evolution of fixed non-parametric morphological classes, and find that much of the size evolution of Sersic-classified bulges and disks may be explained by the preferential quenching of disks in the smallest bulge + disk systems at a given epoch.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: why is quenching so strongly linked to galaxy structure?



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personal website

Marc Rafelski

Overview of the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISPs)

I will present an overview of WISPs, which is an HST pure parallel program using the WFC3 G102 and G141 grisms to study intermediate redshift galaxies. I will present our current data release and emission line catalogs, observing status, and new results from the team. I will also discuss the H-alpha and OIII luminosity functions, and some physical properties of z~2 emission line galaxies.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Hakim Atek

Star Formation History of Extreme Emission Line Galaxies

Much of our empirical knowledge of galaxy evolution is based on magnitude-limited samples that include mostly massive galaxy populations. I will present recent results from HST slitless spectroscopy observations that provide unbiased measures of galaxy evolution to a very low stellar mass range (10^8-10^9 Msol) around the peak epoch of star formation at z~2. Some of these galaxies show extremely strong emission lines and follow a stochastic star formation rather than a secular process observed in their massive counterparts. These starburst episodes in dwarf galaxies may have a more important role than expected.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Ivelina Momcheva

The 3D-HST Survey

3D-HST is a 248-orbit spectroscopic survey with the Hubble Space Telescope designed to study galaxy evolution at z>1. Providing the critical third dimension - redshift - via slitless optical and near-IR grism spectra, 3D-HST opens new possibilities for science and discovery in the deep extragalactic fields AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-S and UKIDSS-UDS. We have combined the grism observations with archival data to create an unique dataset which incorporates ~2000 HST orbits. Observations have been completed and all final data products have been made public. I will demonstrate the data products from the survey, present science highlights from recent publications, and discuss how we can use the insights from 3D-HST to inform future work with Hubble and other planned missions.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

30 min

Lobby

Gabriel Brammer

Maximizing the Science Return from Space-Based Slitless Spectroscopy

I will provide an overview of the analysis tools used for the 3D-HST and other HST slitless spectroscopic surveys.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Danilo Marchesini

3DHST-CANDELS: the structural evolution of galaxies as a function of stellar mass since z=3

I present the evolution of the stellar mass functions and number densities of quiescent and star-forming galaxies as a function of structural properties (i.e., size, Sersic index, compactness) over the last ~11.5 billion years of cosmic history since z=3.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: Are the systematic uncertainties for dusty galaxies under control? The role of this sub-population appears to increase with increasing stellar mass and redshift. Are we modeling their SEDs in a satisfactory way? Are their estimated redshifts and stellar population properties even remotely right? How do we make progress on these issues?



contact the speaker
personal website
presentation

Benjamin Weiner

Emission Line Galaxy Properties from Grism Surveys

HST grism surveys allow the selection of galaxies on emission line flux without pre-selection on mass or magnitude. This possibility to do unbiased line surveys is tempered by the realities that emission line flux represents star formation rate mediated by systematic dependences on extinction and metallicity, and that redshift surveys using the grism are dependent to some degree on photo-z success or willingness to inspect many spectra down to faint magnitudes (or both). I will discuss comparisons of grism H-alpha and [O III] line fluxes to star forming samples selected in the far-IR and measurements of extinction from nebular lines; trends in emission line flux ratios; and the bivariate distribution of line intensity and magnitude, and its relation to extreme emission line galaxies.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: How large are the short term variations in star formation history of SF galaxies, are these directly linked to gas content, and what are the prospects for constraining the gas content even with ALMA?



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presentation

Michael Maseda

The Number Density Evolution of Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in 3D-HST

I will present a new method to search for emission lines in the data from the 3DHST survey. Using a novel statistical technique, I can detect compact emission lines close to the noise level of the grism exposures. Unlike previous methods, the Bayesian nature allows for probabilistic line identifications, namely redshift estimates, based on secondary emission line detections and/or photometric redshift priors. As a first application, I measure the comoving number density of Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (restframe [O III] /Halpha equivalent widths in excess of 500 Angstroms). I find that these galaxies are more than 10x more common above z~1.5 than at z<0.5.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Kasper B. Schmidt

GLASS: Grism Spectroscopy of Clusters and The Early Universe

The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey From Space (GLASS) has observed 10 massive clusters, including the 6 HFF clusters, with the G102, G141 (cluster core) and G800L (parallel fields) HST grisms. I will present GLASS and give an overview of the most recent science results, focusing on the spectroscopy of galaxies at the epoch of reionization at z>6.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Sangeeta Malhotra

Overview of the FIGS survey

Overview of the FIGS survey


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Lunch will be catered at the Greenberg Center.


75 min

Dining Room

Brian Siana

Dwarf Galaxies at the Peak Epoch of Star Formation

We have conducted deep HST near-UV imaging and Keck spectroscopy of dwarf galaxies at 1<z<3 behind four lensing clusters. I will present the evolution of the faint-end of the UV luminosity function, the UV extinction in these galaxies, and their contribution to the total star formation rate density at these epochs. In addition, I will present preliminary constraints on the short-timescale star formation histories of this population and whether or not our current samples of dwarf galaxies are biased.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: What are the star formation histories of dwarf galaxies, and are we missing a substantial population of galaxies if/when they are periodically 'quenched'?



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Pascal Oesch

The UV View of Early Galaxy Build-up

Thanks to very deep multi-wavelength imaging surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope, great progress has been made in exploring galaxies in the early universe, reaching to less than 500 Myr after the Big Bang, at z~10. Based on rest-frame UV imaging, we have now assembled an unprecedented sample of ~11'000 galaxies at z>3 and in combination with very deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging, we can now trace the stellar mass density over 96% of cosmic history. In this talk, I will present results on the stellar mass build-up in the early universe down to the peak of cosmic star-formation, including first results based on a Lyman Break galaxy selection at z~2 using a new HST WFC3/UVIS legacy program, the Hubble Deep UV (HDUV) survey over the two GOODS fields. This allows us to probe the faint galaxy population that dominates the cosmic star-formation rate density at z>2 for a self-consistently measurement of the star-formation and stellar mass build-up across the first ~3 Gyr of cosmic history.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

David Sobral

Exploring the z~6-9 Universe with the largest Lyman-alpha narrow-band surveys

I will present new results from our very wide-field (~2-10 deg^2) narrow-band surveys that trace H-alpha, [OIII], [OII] and Lyman-alpha all the way to z~9, including a large, matched Lya-Ha survey at z=2.23 to calibrate Lyman-alpha (CALYMHA). One of the most surprising results is the discovery of a significant number of luminous Lyman-alpha emitters at z~6-7 which seem to be powered by PopIII-like/extremely metal poor populations.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: Emission lines at high redshifts, stellar populations and the escape fraction.



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personal website
presentation

Nor Pirzkal

EM2D: Searching for naked emission line in slitless spectroscopic observations

We show how multiple epochs of slitless spectroscopic observations can be used to pinpoint the source of emission lines. Our method is independent of imaging data and allows us to search for naked emission lines which would have remained unobserved in past surveys. When imaging is available, we are able to identify and resolve individual star forming regions in galaxies.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Discussion Leaders: Kim-Vy Tran and Jennifer Lotz

Discussion: Census

Have we mapped most of the stars and star formation over cosmic time? Where can we expect, or do we need, progress in the future?


60 min

Amphitheater

30 min

Lobby

Stijn Wuyts

KMOS3D: dynamical constraints on the mass budget in early star-forming disks

We exploit deep integral-field spectroscopic observations with KMOS/VLT of ~140 star-forming disks at 0.7 < z < 2.6 to dynamically constrain their mass budget. I will discuss the relation between estimated masses of the stellar/baryonic components and those inferred from dynamical modeling.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: What comes first, bulge or disk?



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Naveen Reddy

Measurements of Balmer Decrements and the Dust Attenuation Curve at High Redshift

I will present results on the dust attenuation curve of z~2 galaxies using data from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, and the implications for deriving stellar populations and the dust/stars geometry in high-redshift galaxies.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

221 Everit St, New Haven, CT

Coffee and pastries will be provided at the Greenberg Center.


30 min

Lobby

Sirio Belli

Connect the dots: How to find galaxy progenitors using deep rest-frame optical spectroscopy

Using a large sample of deep spectra obtained at Keck, I will illustrate two methods to link galaxies with their progenitors at higher redshift. The first technique is simply a selection of galaxies at fixed stellar velocity dispersion, and is based on the assumption that such physical property does not change significantly throughout the evolution of a galaxy. The second method consists in reconstructing the past star formation history of a galaxy and inferring the properties of its progenitor at a given lookback time. Both techniques require deep observations of rest-frame optical spectra.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: What causes galaxy quenching?



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Paul Torrey

Simulated Galaxy Number Density Evolution

I'll discuss the number density evolution tracks that simulated galaxy populations follow in time. I'll outline a basic physical framework that can be used to understand the median evolution and dispersion growth with time. The prescribed non-constant comoving number density evolution tracks can easily be applied to observational data.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Adam Muzzin

Galaxy Formation as Seen by UltraVISTA

I will discuss the latest results on the formation of massive galaxies from the UltraVISTA survey.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Erica Nelson

Where stars form: inside-out growth and coherent star formation across the main sequence from HST H-alpha maps at z~1

Imaging surveys with HST have demonstrated that many galaxies attained their current forms at z~1. Key to understanding this process is a direct measurement of the distribution of star formation within galaxies at this crucial epoch. This is now possible with the WFC3 grism capability on HST, as it provides H-alpha maps of all galaxies at 0.7< z <1.5 in its field of view. Using H-alpha maps for ~2000 galaxies, we show where star formation is distributed in galaxies across the star formation - mass plane (the 'main sequence'). We find that the disk scale length of H-alpha is larger than that of the stellar continuum emission, consistent with inside-out assembly of galactic disks. Across the main sequence, we find evidence for 'coherent star formation': in galaxies with higher than average star formation rates, H-alpha is enhanced throughout the disk; similarly, in galaxies with low star formation rates H-alpha is depressed throughout the disk. I discuss these results in the context of several proposed mechanisms for enhancing and quenching star formation. I also show first results of the spatial distribution of star formation at z~2-3.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: Once we can resolve early galaxies, will they just look the same as modern ones?



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Kim-Vy Tran

ZFOURGE & ZFIRE: Galaxy Evolution Over 13 Billion Years

ZFOURGE and ZFIRE are deep near-IR surveys that track how galaxies assemble over cosmic time. ZFOURGE identifies approximately 30,000 galaxies up to redshifts of z~7 using a custom set of medium-band near-IR filters that provide high precision photometric redshifts. ZFIRE selects galaxies from ZFOURGE for spectroscopic follow-up with Keck/MOSFIRE to measure how baryons cycle between stars, winds, and the Inter-Stellar Medium at z~2. Here I summarize our results that include stellar mass functions at 0.5<z<3, building a library of composite Spectral Energy Distributions, and ISM conditions of galaxies in clusters at z~2.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: How can we better understand/quantify the interplay between multi-phase gas winds and star formation at z>1 ?



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Kate Whitaker

Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M*), the 'star formation sequence', and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. In this talk, I will consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sersic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-M* plane, using the mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5 selected from the 3D-HST catalogs.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: What are the progenitors of the first quenched galaxies and what shuts off their star formation?



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presentation

30 min

Lobby

Tucker Jones

Spatially resolved metallicity from Hubble spectroscopy

Galaxy metallicity gradients and their evolution with time provide valuable information on gas accretion, outflows, and the mode of growth (mergers vs. in situ star formation). However, gradient studies in distant galaxies are challenging due to requirements of high spatial resolution and broad wavelength coverage. I will discuss progress from measuring metallicity gradients in gravitationally lensed galaxies at z=1-3, with a focus on recent results from Hubble grism spectroscopy.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Eva Wuyts

The evolution of metallicity and metallicity gradients from z=2.7 to 0.6 with KMOS3D

The KMOS3D survey uses 3DHST grism redshifts to study the spatially-resolved kinematics and star formation for a mass-selected sample of star-forming galaxies at z=2.7 to 0.6. I will discuss what we learn about the integrated and spatially resolved abundances for these galaxies from measurements of the [NII]/Ha ratio.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Marijn Franx

Analyzing stacked spectra from 3D-HST: comparison with models

Analyzing stacked spectra from 3D-HST: comparison with models


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Guillermo Barro

Formation and evolution of compact SFGs at z~2

I'll present a summary of our recent papers on the properties of a population of massive compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) at 2 < z < 3, whose structural properties and number densities suggest they are the direct progenitors of the remarkably small quiescent galaxies at those redshifts. I'll discuss their unique structural, star-forming and kinematic properties determined from a wealth of wavelength data including high-resolution HST imaging, Spitzer/MIPS and Herschel/PACS far-IR photometry and MOSFIRE NIR spectroscopy. I'll also provide some insights on their formation processes and their evolutionary tracks in different scaling relations based on the predictions of high resolution hydro-dynamical simulations.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: How do massive compact SFGs form/evolve. Do they live in different halos?, experience different accretion/interaction processes?, or they just happen to be the small size boundary of 'normal', massive SFGs at high-z.



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Drew Newman

A Strongly Lensed Massive Quiescent Galaxy at z=2.636: Indications of Rotation

I will present the discovery and characterization of a rare, strongly lensed quiescent galaxy at z=2.636. The galaxy is very massive (2-3 x 10^11 Msol) and compact, but can be spatially resolved in ground-based spectroscopic data thanks to the lensing magnification. Using observations undertaken with FIRE and MOSFIRE, we measure resolved stellar kinematics for the first time at this redshift and compare the degree of rotational support with that of likely descendants and with results from merger simulations.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Sarah Wellons

The diverse progenitors and descendants of z=2 massive compact galaxies in Illustris

I have identified a population of galaxies in the Illustris simulation which are analogs to observed massive compact quiescent galaxies at z=2. These galaxies can be traced forward and backward through the simulation to identify their progenitors and descendants at other redshifts. I will present the variety of formation and evolution mechanisms that these galaxies experience, and briefly discuss the implications of the diversity of their evolutionary paths for observational methods of connecting progenitor and descendant galaxy populations.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Lunch will be catered at the Greenberg Center.


75 min

Dining Room

Alison Coil

AGN Feedback at z~2 in the MOSDEF Survey

I will present results on AGN feedback at z~2 using data from the on-going Keck/MOSDEF survey. I will focus on AGN outflows as identified through blueshifted [OIII] emission lines in AGN selected at X-ray, IR, and/or optical wavelengths. I will discuss the high incidence, kinematics, and spatial extent of these AGN outflows, as well as their host galaxy properties. The MOSDEF survey provides a stellar mass complete galaxy sample at z~2 from which we can robustly determine how common such AGN outflows are, at the peak of cosmic accretion.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Marla Geha

Searching for Satellites Around Galactic Analogs (the SAGA Project)

Abstract TBA


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Arjen van der Wel

The LEGA-C Survey

Our ever-improving measurements of proxies for the physical quantities we are interested in -- mass, dynamical state, age, chemical composition -- now include sizes and shapes thanks to large HST surveys. I will first give a brief overview and basic (naive?) interpretation of structural evolution between z=3 and the present. Then I will present the first results from LEGA-C, a 128-night VLT survey aimed at obtaining deep continuum spectroscopy of z~1 galaxies and directly measuring their masses, ages and metallicities. In particular, I will discuss the prospects of directly measuring the star-formation histories of individual galaxies between from z~3 to z~1.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: Connecting progenitors / descendants. Does quenching require compaction?



contact the speaker
personal website

Rosalind Skelton

Demographics of massive galaxies in pairs

TBC


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

15 min

Lobby

Discussion Leaders: Rachel Somerville and Rachel Bezanson

Discussion: Evolution

Do we know when, and from what ancestors, the present-day galaxy population arose? What aspects are the most uncertain? Where can we expect progress?


60 min

Amphitheater

15 min

Lobby

David Wake

Galaxy Clustering in UltraVISTA, CANDELS and 3D-HST

We will present new measurements of the stellar mass dependent clustering of galaxies using data from the UltraVISTA, CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys and use them to infer how the relationship between stellar and dark matter halo mass has evolved since z ~ 3.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Gregory Rudnick

The Molecular Gas Contents of z=1.62 cluster galaxies and their Last Gasp of Star Formation

I will present JVLA CO imaging in the 1-0 transition of a z=1.62 galaxy cluster located in the UKIDSS/UDS and covered by the 3D-HST data. These are the deepest existing data in CO(1-0), corresponding to nearly 100 hours of JVLA observations, and are giving us the powerful ability to study the molecular gas contents of massive cluster galaxies when they were in the last throes of their star formation. The 3D-HST data are crucial to this endeavor as they 1) give us accurate redshifts with which to confirm membership, 2) give us the ability to reject cluster interlopers, and 3) serve as a strong redshift prior to search for weak CO lines. We securely detect two cluster members in CO(1-0) at the expected frequency given the grism redshifts. This nearly doubles the number of published CO(1-0) detections of normal star-forming galaxies at high redshift. These two galaxies are massive, with log(Mstar~11) and extremely gas rich (Mgas/Mbaryon~0.6-0.7). Despite their very large gas reservoirs they are forming stars at a sedate pace for their stellar mass and lie on or below the main star formation sequence. I will discuss potential reasons for the apparent high CO luminosities (and correspondingly low star formation efficiencies) of these objects, e.g. stablization of the gas by a compact stellar configuration or abnormally low conversion factors from CO to molecular hydrogen. I will also comment on the implications of this interesting finding for understanding the truncation of gas accretion onto distant cluster galaxies, the end of star formation in the massive cluster galaxy population, and the biases in existing CO surveys that target galaxies based primarily on their star formation rates or rest-frame optical color.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Ivo Labbe

Stellar mass build up in the first billion years

Joint HST/WFC3 and Spitzer/IRAC observations are a powerful probe of the build up of galaxies in the early universe z > 4. Using new ultradeep IRAC from GREATS: GOODS Re-ionization Era wide-Area Treasury from Spitzer, the latest wide field data from UltraVISTA, and spectroscopic follow up on selected galaxies, I'll discuss what we can learn about galaxy properties and the build up of stellar mass in the first billion years.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: From evolution of samples to evolution of individual galaxies, stellar population model degeneracies, incompleteness at z > 3, dust.



contact the speaker
personal website

Coffee and pastries will be provided at the Greenberg Center.


30 min

Lobby

Charlie Conroy

Stars, CMDs and Stellar Pops

TBD


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Camilla Pacifici

Timing the evolution of local galaxies

We combine multi-wavelength observations of a very large sample of galaxies at z<0.16, with physically motivated models of galaxy spectral energy distributions to set constraints on the timescales in which galaxies form their stellar mass.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: What is the relative importance of different mechanisms (mergers, AGN feedback, supernova feedback, environment, morphological transformation, etc.) when galaxies quench their star formation?



contact the speaker
personal website

Joel Leja

A new framework for stellar populations in galaxies

We present a new framework for stellar populations in galaxies, based on the Flexible Stellar Populations Synthesis (FSPS) code. Our model includes dust absorption and re-radiation, a flexible attenuation curve, nebular emission, and a 4-parameter star formation history. The parameter space is sampled via MCMC techniques. We fit a catalog of UV to far-IR broad-band photometry for 129 local galaxies, and compare the derived physical parameters to information extracted from aperture-matched optical spectroscopy. Our code predicts the Halpha fluxes of these galaxies with little scatter and no offset, an exquisite test of the model star formation histories, dust absorptions, and stellar metallicities. We show that it also accurately recovers spectral age metrics (Dn(4000) and H-delta absorption) and dust properties (Balmer decrements). Our code predicts star formation rates and stellar masses which are substantially different than analogous SED-fitting codes.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: What is the most effective way to get accurate and precise star formation rates for statistically significant samples of galaxies at z=0-3?



contact the speaker
personal website

Rachel Bezanson

Massive Galaxy Scaling Relations through Cosmic Time

I will discuss recent observational studies of the structural and dynamical properties of massive high-redshift galaxies. Specifically, I will demonstrate that in spite of their dramatic structural evolution, the mass fundamental plane, or the empirical relation between dynamics, sizes, stellar mass surface density of massive galaxies, has been in place since z~2. This relation appears to hold for massive galaxies of all types, not just red, dead ellipticals. Therefore, this scaling relation is an ideal tool to follow the evolution of galaxy populations through cosmic time. Finally, I will describe two ongoing spectroscopic surveys, CHOMP and LEGA-C, that will probe massive galaxy evolution since z~1.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

John Forbes

What information is there in the scatter of galaxy scaling relations?

I will present a simple way of understanding the scatter in the star-forming main sequence and the mass-metallicity relation, and the correlation between SFR and Z embodied in the fundamental metallicity relation. To do this I use an extension of ''equilibrium''/''bathtub'' models. Nontrivial constraints can be placed on the character of accretion onto galaxies with this approach.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: How strong are galactic winds, and what launches them?



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Rachel Somerville

Quenching and Morphological Transformation across cosmic time

TBD


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

30 min

Lobby

Alyson Brooks

Feedback's Role in the Growth of Galaxy Centers

Feedback is often invoked as a promising avenue for reducing/preventing bulge growth in cosmological simulations of disk galaxies. I will briefly review the physics employed by various simulators, and examine successes and failures. I will show that mergers actually reduce the central concentration of dwarf galaxies, and discuss the potential for feedback to reduce central mass growth as a function of galaxy mass while simultaneously reproducing other galaxy properties.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Dusan Keres

Galaxy evolution in FIRE simulations

Improvements in modeling of star formation and explicit, small scale, stellar feedback in FIRE simulations enable us to re-examine many questions related to formation and evolution of galaxies. I will discuss our recent findings from FIRE simulations, including star formation histories of galaxies, outflows and infall of gas and how they jointly shape galaxy evolution.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Freeke van de Voort

A persistent misaligned gas disc in an early-type galaxy

Massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) commonly have gas discs which are kinematically mis- aligned with the stellar component. These discs feel a torque from the stars and the angular momentum vectors are expected to align quickly (~100 Myr). I will present results on the evolution of a misaligned gas disc in a cosmological simulation of a massive ETG from the FIRE project. This galaxy experiences a merger which removes most of the original gas disc. The galaxy subsequently reforms a gas disc through accretion of cold gas, but it is initially 120 degrees misaligned with the stellar rota- tion axis. This misalignment persists for about 2 Gyr, because the gas disc is accreting a significant amount of mass for about 1.5 Gyr after the merger, during which the angular momentum change induced by accreted gas dominates over that induced by stellar torques. Once the gas accretion rate has decreased sufficiently, the gas disc decouples from the surrounding halo gas and realigns with the stellar component in about six dynamical times. I will discuss the observational consequences of the long survival of our misaligned gas disc and how our results can be used to calibrate merger rate estimates from observed gas misalignments.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Pieter van Dokkum

The 'parallel tracks' model: galaxy growth, quenching, and galaxy diversity

The evolution of galaxies in the size-mass plane is examined, using observations and simulations. One axis in this plane measures how rapidly galaxies acquire stellar mass and the other how rapidly galaxies grow in size. We show that star forming galaxies move along parallel tracks in this plane, with a shallow slope: an increase in mass by a factor of 10 is accompanied by an increase in size of only a factor of 2. The shallow slopes imply that the velocity dispersions and central stellar densities of galaxies gradually increase with time while they are forming stars. Galaxies quench when they reach a threshold stellar density. After quenching galaxies move along a very steep (minor merger) track, where a factor of 2 increase in mass is accompanied by a factor of 4 increase in size. This simple description explains the main trends in the galaxy population from z~3 to the present, including the presence of a population of compact, massive star forming galaxies at z~2, without the need for processes to make galaxies smaller ('compaction').


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Trevor Mendel

A deep look at quiescent galaxies with KMOS@VLT

I will discuss our recent efforts to study a large sample of quiescent galaxies at 1.5 < z < 2 using deep NIR spectroscopy obtained using KMOS. In particular, I plan to focus on the kinematic properties of galaxies in our sample, and discuss how we can interpret these kinematics in the context of deep multi-wavelength imaging data.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Lunch will be catered at the Greenberg Center.


75 min

Dining Room

Alaina Henry

The Metallicity Evolution of Galaxies: Exciting Potential and Considerable Challenges

The gas-phase metallicities are sensitive to the exchange of gas between galaxies and the IGM. Hence, studies of the mass-metallicity relation and metallicity gradients offer great potential to constrain the baryon cycle of galaxies. Recent advances in multi-object near infrared spectroscopy have opened up the field for measuring the evolution of metallicities, and grism spectroscopy is particularly sensitive to low-mass galaxies where mass-loss from outflows is most important. In my talk, I will present the first high-redshift measurement of the mass-metallicity relation to reach 10^8 Msun. Then, I will demonstrate how this relation can be used to test equilibrium models for galaxy formation. Despite these advances in technology and cosmological simulations, emission line metallicity diagnostics remain poorly understood. Therefore, in order to interpret current data and make the best use of future observatories, new studies are needed. To conclude, I will discuss how low-redshift analogs for high-redshift galaxies may shed light on the challenging problems of metallicity calibration.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: The problem I worry most about is our inability to measure gas properties like metallicity and ionization parameter from emission lines. Until we understand why high-redshift galaxies are offset on the BPT diagram, and why metallicity calibrations show large systematic differences, the utility of metallicity measurements will be limited.



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Shy Genel

The angular momentum of simulated galaxy populations

Some current-generation cosmological hydrodynamical simulations seem to be able, for the first time, to roughly reproduce the angular momentum content of z=0 galaxies. I will discuss predictions from the Illustris simulation for the angular momentum of high-redshift galaxies, and various relations between angular momentum and other galaxy properties such as size and SFR.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Allison Strom

KBSS-MOSFIRE: Ionization, excitation, and abundance ratios in z~2-3 star-forming galaxies

I will present new results from the MOSFIRE component of the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), which is a large spectroscopic survey that jointly targets the rest-optical and rest-UV spectra of 2<z<3 star-forming galaxies in fields around bright QSOs. The KBSS currently comprises over 1000 galaxies (~730 at z~2) with rest-optical spectroscopy from MOSFIRE, with stellar masses ranging from 10^9 to 10^11.5 M_sun and star-formation rates down to a few M_sun/yr. The first results from KBSS-MOSFIRE confirmed that HII regions in high-redshift galaxies are physically distinct from those observed in local galaxies; our data suggest that the observed 'BPT offset' can be explained by a combination of: harder ionizing spectra, larger ionization parameters, and variations in abundance ratios (specifically nitrogen-to-oxygen) relative to z~0. I will present my efforts to disentangle the contributions of these various effects using robust measurements of the entire suite of strong rest-optical diagnostic emission lines (including H-alpha, H-beta, [OIII], [OII], [NII], [SII], and [NeIII]) for the largest sample of high-z galaxies to date, along with complementary rest-UV spectroscopy from Keck-LRIS for nearly 2/3 of the KBSS-MOSFIRE sample.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Britt Lundgren

Linking Cool, Enriched Gas to Galaxies at z > 1

Metal-enriched absorption features in quasar spectra have long been known to trace circumgalactic gas around intervening galaxies to high redshifts. However, their utility for studying the gaseous processes that may drive galaxy evolution has long been hampered by the observational difficulties of directly imaging absorption-selected galaxies. I will present results from a Cycle 21 HST program, which obtained WFC3/IR direct imaging and grism observations of the fields surrounding the 9 most metal-rich quasar sight lines in the SDSS. Nearly all of the 56 targeted absorbers in these fields are unambiguously matched to galaxies with emission lines in the grism data, thereby doubling the number of spectroscopically confirmed Mg II absorbing galaxies in the literature at z > 1. The sensitivity and resolution of the observations reveal the typical star-forming and structural properties of Mg II selected galaxies at high-z, as a function of absorption strength, impact parameter, and environment.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Frank van den Bosch

Assembly Bias

Halo Occupation Models assume that halo mass is the sole property that determines, in a statistical sense, the properties of galaxies. I present evidence that this assumption is wrong (as expected), and discuss the implications for halo occupation modeling in general.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

15 min

Lobby

Discussion Leaders: Shy Genel and Freeke van de Voort

Discussion: Physics

Have we captured the key physical processes that drive galaxy evolution? What aspects are the most uncertain? Where can we expect progress?


60 min

Amphitheater

15 min

Lobby

Emily Wisnioski

Tracing high-z galaxy kinematics from turbulent disks to quenched spheroids

Kinematics and structural properties have revealed that the majority of 'normal' star-forming galaxies at z~1-3 host disk-like structure. Using recent observations from large near-infrared galaxy surveys, I will discuss the formation and evolutionary paths of high redshift disks. In particular, I will present results from the KMOS^3D survey, an integral field survey of over 600 galaxies at z=0.7-2.7 using KMOS at the VLT. We compare the gas velocity dispersion of massive galaxies with data spanning from z=4 to z=0. The un-biased selection of KMOS^3D allows us to explore galaxy dynamics both on and below the star-forming 'main sequence' opening up new avenues in investigating evolutionary links between turbulent disks and quenched spheroids.


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Natascha M. Forster Schreiber

Galaxy evolution from spatially and spectrally resolved studies -- 3D-HST and IFUs synergies

I will highlight recent key progress in our knowledge about the formation and evolution of galaxies at redshift z ~ 1 - 3, with an emphasis on spatially- and spectrally-resolved studies, including the KMOS^3D survey that builds on a crucial synergy between 3D-HST and VLT/IFU observations. I will highlight the implications for our understanding of physical processes governing the mass assembly, star formation, and feedback at the peak epoch of cosmic star formation activity. Note: this presentation will be cooordinated with those of other participants involved in the KMOS^3D survey (E. Wisnioski, S. Wuyts, E. Wuyts).


10 min (+ 5 min Q&A)

Amphitheater

Unresolved problem: Angular momentum



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60 min

Lobby

Hack Day

If you would like to get started on working with the 3D-HST data set, make progress on a related project or spend time working on a project with other conference participants, please join us on Thursday morning at the Yale Astronomy Department 'Coffee Shop'. There will be a coffee break from 10:00 to 10:30 and carts lunch at noon. You are welcome to stay as long as you want.

Half Day +

Astro Coffee Shop, 52 Hillhouse, New Haven, CT

venue

Maurice R. Greenberg Conference Center

Yale University

address

391 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511
1 203 436-5866
1.5 mi / 2.4 km from Downtown

more information

Accommodation

We have negotiated a special rate for you at the Omni Hotel in downtown New Haven.
To take advantage of the conference rate of $149 per night, plese make your reservations by October 1st.

Omni Hotel New Haven

To reserve a room at the special conference rate, click on the link below.

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